Past Research Groups

Annual research groups in the field of Antisemitism and Racism established by the Roth Institute in previous years 

group

As part of its efforts to promote research at Tel Aviv University on antisemitism and racism, the Roth Institute established an annual Research Group for students and scholars of antisemitism and racism in 2012. Composed of MA and PhD students from the different faculties at TAU as well as post-doctoral fellows, the Roth Institute’s annual Research Group serves as an ongoing forum that allows students and scholars to work together towards improving the quality of their individual research projects.

In addition to providing leading students at TAU with financial and institutional support, the annual Research Group helps create a vibrant community of students and scholars from a variety of departments at TAU. Through regular seminars, guest lectures and workshops, the research group integrates promising graduate students into a rich network of scholars and students in Israel and worldwide working on different aspects of antisemitism and racism. Members of the research group work together on a regular basis in the Roth Institute’s workspace in TAU’s Gilman Building.

 

 


 

2019-2020

Research Group on "Jews and the Left: Past, Present, Future"

in Cooperation with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

The Roth Institute’s 2020 Research Group is dedicated to the topic of “Jews and the Left: Past, Present, Future.”  With MA and PhD students from TAU’s departments of History, Jewish History and Cultural Studies as well as a post-doctoral fellow, the group is dedicated to investigating the various connections between Jews and political movements and groups on “the Left” in both the past and the present.

Sponsored by the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, the Tel-Aviv group meets regularly to discuss key works, host guest seminars and probe the many different connections between Jews and “the Left” over the past hundred and fifty years. 

Yarden Ben Zur, Tel Aviv University

Yarden Ben-Zur is an MA graduate student in Tel Aviv University's Department of Literature and a research assistant in the Minerva Institute for German History at the same University. His MA thesis has been recently submitted under the title: "(Dis)order and Receding Speech: Poetics of Resignation and the Idea of Revolution in Gustav Landauer's Writings". It focuses on the unique affiliations between literature and revolution in the writings of the German-Jewish anarchist, through an examination of the term Entsagung in German literature and culture of the 19th and 20th century.  

Julija Levin, Tel Aviv University

Julija Levin is an MA graduate student in Tel Aviv University's Department of Jewish History. Her MA thesis examines the social realities of Jewish maidservants in Jewish households in Imperial Russia, in particular their place in the family, gender specific issues such as illegitimate pregnancies, infanticide and gender violence, and questions of class.

 

Dr. Gilad Sharvit, Towson University, Maryland

Visiting Scholar, Summer 2020

Gilad Sharvit is an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Towson University. A scholar of modern Jewish thought, Sharvit's interests lie in Jewish philosophy, German-Jewish literature and culture, German and continental philosophy, psychoanalysis and critical theory. Sharvit is the author of "Therapeutics and Salvation: Freud and Schelling on Freedom" (forthcoming in Hebrew with the Hebrew University Magnes Press) and co-editor and contributing author of the volumes “Freud and Monotheism: The Violent Origins of Religion” with Karen Feldman (Fordham University Press, 2018) and “Canonization and Alterity: Heresy in Jewish History, Thought, and Literature” with Willi Goetschel (De Gruyter, 2020). 

 

Gilad Shenhav, Tel Aviv University

Gilad Shenhav is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Porter School of Cultural Studies in Tel-Aviv University, and at the Martin Buber Professorship in Goethe University Frankfurt am Main. His dissertation project titled "Abyss and Messiah: Reflections on the Question of Language" focuses on the writings of Gershom Scholem and Jacques Derrida alongside the German and Jewish sources which their thought echoes. His research interests include Modern German-Jewish thought, continental philosophy, Political Philosophy, Talmud and Jewish Mysticism.

 

Lelia Stadler, Columbia University

Lelia Stadler has completed a MA in Latin American history from Tel Aviv University and ‎she is currently a PhD student in the Columbia University Department of History. Her ‎research focuses on 20th century Jewish-Latin American history from a regional and ‎gendered perspective. Her recent publication, “In Search of Wandering Husbands: Jewish Migration, Desertion, and Divorce between Poland and Argentina, 1919–1939,” appeared in ‎Brill.‎

 

Dr. Alex Valdman, Tel Aviv University

Alex Valdman received his PhD from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 2017. He is a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Jewish History at Haifa University. Prior to that, he was postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

His publications include “A Miracle in Minsk: Secondary Education and Social Mobility in the Pale of Settlement before 1887” (Jewish Social Studies), “Jewish Acculturation in Late Nineteenth-Century Russia. The Case of Yonah Berkhin” (East European Jewish Affairs), and “Shaʼul Ginsburg and the Non-Radical Pattern in Jewish-Russian Historiography” (Zion. A Quarterly for Research in Jewish History [in Hebrew]). He is also a contributor and member of the editorial group of “Zionist Organizations in Soviet Russia, 1917–1922. A Documentary History,” an international collaborative project led by Professor Ziva Galili, Rutgers University.

 

 

2018-2019

Research Group on "Jews and the Left: Past, Present, Future"

in Cooperation with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

 

Katarzyna Czerwonogóra, Tel Aviv University

Katarzyna Czerwonogóra is a PhD student at the Department of the Jewish History of the Tel Aviv University. Her current research focuses on the relationship between Zionism and feminism in the lives of three Jewish women who lived at the turn of the twentieth century: Puah Rakovsky, Rahel Straus and Rosa Welt-Straus. Before coming to Israel in 2013, she undertook graduate studies in sociology at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. There, she wrote her MA thesis about the identities of Jewish women in contemporary Poland.

The topics of her thesis and dissertation reflect her broader interest in the processes of the shaping of the modern identities of Jewish women in Europe, Israel and the United States. An appealing phenomenon in these developments are convergences – and tensions – between various political and ideological commitments.

 

Sarah Gavison, University of Colorado


Sarah Gavison is a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Colorado Boulder. Her fields of interest are international relations and diplomatic history (World War II, Cold War, and Arab-Israeli Conflict) and Jewish studies (Holocaust studies, post-Holocaust migrations).

She is now living in Israel and just entered the writing phase of her doctoral dissertation “What should we do with the Jews? The USSR, the US, Jewish refugees in Post-World War II Europe, and the creation of Israel.” For this transnational study, she is using Soviet, US, Israeli, and UN archives, and working under the supervision of Dr. Tom Zeiler (US diplomatic history, World War II/Cold War) and Dr. David Shneer (Jewish studies and Soviet history). 

Sarah has worked as assistant archivist for the Harry Mazal Holocaust Collection (May 2014-Aug. 2016) and as assistant managing editor for East European Jewish Affairs (Aug. 2015-Aug. 2017). For the academic year 2017-2018, she was awarded the Truman Library Institute’s Dissertation Year Fellowship and the CU Boulder Graduate School's Dissertation Completion Fellowship. She intends to finish writing her dissertation during her time as visiting scholar at  the Roth Institute, and to graduate in the Spring/Summer 2018.

 

Julija Levin, Tel Aviv University

Julija Levin currently is an MA student of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University. She received her BA in Hebrew and Jewish Studies from the University College London. Her research interests focus on Lithuanian Jewry, and she is now learning about Jews in the pre-partition Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

 

Dr. Gilad Sharvit, Tel Aviv University

Gilad Sharvit is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism and the Minerva Center for German History at Tel Aviv University. Sharvit is a scholar of modern Jewish intellectual history with a broad interest in Jewish philosophy, German-Jewish literature and culture, continental philosophy, psychoanalysis and Critical theory. His current research focuses on the intersection of theories of history, politics, and messianism in twentieth-century German-Jewish world. Sharvit received his PhD from the Philosophy Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (2014), was a Diller Post-Doctoral fellow at the Center for Jewish Studies at the University of California, Berkeley (2014-16) and a Townsend Fellow at the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities at UC Berkeley (2016-17). 

Sharvit is co-editor and a contributing author of the volume Freud and Monotheism: Moses and the Violent Origins of Religion (Fordham University Press, 2018). His book project, "The Negation of History: Messianism and Repetition in Modern Jewish Thought," is currently under review for publication. He is currently working on an edited volume on Jewish heresy for the series “Perspectives on Jewish Texts and Contexts” of De Gruyter Press.

 

Gilad Shenhav, Tel Aviv University

Gilad Shenhav is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Porter School of Cultural Studies in Tel-Aviv University, and at the Martin Buber Professorship in Goethe University Frankfurt am Main. His dissertation project titled "Abyss and Messiah: Reflections on the Question of Language" focuses on the writings of Gershom Scholem and Jacques Derrida alongside the German and Jewish sources which their thought echoes. His research interests include Modern German-Jewish thought, continental philosophy, Political Philosophy, Talmud and Jewish Mysticism.

 

Lelia Stadler, Tel Aviv University

Lelia Stadler is a master's student in Latin American History at Tel Aviv University. Her MA thesis, “Lost Husbands: Jewish Bigamy and Divorce Between Argentina and Poland, 1919-1939,” supervised by Professor Raanan Rein, focuses on 20th-century migration history, gender, transatlantic ties, and the modern Jewish family. Lelia has received a BA with honors from the Department of General History and the Multidisciplinary Program in the Humanities from Tel Aviv University. During her MA she has studied at the Universidad Complutense in Madrid.

 


 

2017-2018

Research Group on "Antisemitism and Islamophobia"

in Cooperation with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

 

Ahuvia Goren


Ahuvia Goren is a research assistant in the department of Jewish History in Tel Aviv University and Studies for M.A In the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas. His research deals with Jewish intellectual history of the modern era, and focuses on natural philosophy in the eyes Rabbinic culture and on modern Jewish politics. Additionally he teaches Judaism and philosophy in 'Machanim' Rabbinical seminary, and is a member of the Interfaith Encounter Israel Organization, and the IARF Europe and Middle East board. 


Gustavo Guzmán


Gustavo Guzmán Castro is a doctoral student in History at Tel Aviv University. His research –supervised by Prof. Raanan Rein– deals with the attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews throughout the twentieth century, proposing an innovative perspective for the study of Antisemitism in Latin America. Instead of focusing on the fascists’ positions in this regard, whose hostility toward Jews during the 1930s and 1940s has been lavishly studied, his research focuses on the attitudes of diverse right-wing actors vis-à-vis Jews during the past century, highlighting relevant changes and continuities. Previously, Mr. Guzmán Castro obtained his MA and BA degrees at Universidad de Chile, in whose Center of Jewish Studies he published several papers about the Chilean right-wing Antisemitism and the subsequent Jewish responses. Recently, he obtained the Robert Wistrich Prize 2017, granted by the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, for his Doctoral Dissertation Proposal.


Dr. Iris Idelson-Shein, Goethe University



Dr. Iris Idelson-Shein is Gerda Henkel research fellow at the Martin Buber department for Jewish Religious Thought at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main. Her research focuses on Jewish thought and culture in the early modern period, with a particular emphasis on gender studies, cultural translation and postcolonial studies. Her recent publications include articles in Jewish Quarterly Review (JQR), Jewish Social Studies, AJS Review, and Eighteenth Century Studies. She is the author of Difference of a Different Kind: Jewish Constructions of Race During the Long Eighteenth Century (Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), and is currently working on a book on monsters in early modern Jewish literature, folklore and art. In addition, she is co-editing with Prof. Christian Wiese a collected volume on Monsters and Monstrosity in Jewish History, which is forthcoming with Bloomsbury Publishing. Since 2013 she has served on the founding editorial board of “German Jewish Cultures,” a book series published by Indiana University Press, in cooperation with the Leo Baeck Institute, London.

 


 

 

2016-2017

Research Group on "Antisemitism and Islamophobia"

in Cooperation with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

 

Salameh Abu Rabia


Salameh Abu Rabia holds a Master's degree in Middle Eastern studies from Tel Aviv University. His research deals with "The Position of the Al-Ahram Newspaper towards Jews of Arab Countries." Salameh has worked a research assistant at the Alliance Center for Iranian Studies, the Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Bezalel Academy, and the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at Ben Gurion University.


Yarden Amir


Yarden Amir is an MA candidate in the research program of the Department of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University. His research compares the construction of Antisemitism as a historical category between two national Jewish historiographers, Simon Dubnow and Ben Zion Dinur. This research aims to spotlight the subjectivity of antisemitism when history is read as literature. Yarden holds a BA in Jewish History and a BA in Hebrew Culture from Tel Aviv University, as well as a teaching diploma for the subject of Jewish Studies.


Efrat Aviv


Efrat Aviv, is a lecturer in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at Bar Ilan University, Israel. She is the author of Anti-Semitism and Anti-Zionism in Turkey(awaiting publication by Routledge.) She is a fellow at BESA (Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies) and was a fellow at SICSA (Vidal Sassoon InternationalCenter for the Study of Antisemitism) between 2011-2015. Publications include, among others: "Antisemitism in Turkey during Operation Protective Edge," book chapter, (Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, forthcoming); "Erdoğan’s Turkey and Obama’s America," American Policy and Standing in the 21st Century: Realities and Perceptions (New York: Routledge, 2016), pp. 213-230; "The EfraimElrom Affair and Israel-Turkey Relations," Middle Eastern Studies 49, 5 (2013), pp. 750-769; "Cartoons in Turkey – From Abdülhamid to Erdoğan," Middle Eastern Studies, 49:2, 2012, pp. 221-236; "EstosMakamesAlegres: Cultural Impacts on the Jewish Community of Izmir on the Eve of the 'Young Turk Revolution': Theater and Music", in Michael Laskier and Jacob Lev (eds.), Converging Judaism and Islam: The Religious, Scientific and Cultural Dimensions (Florida: University Press of Florida, 2011), pp. 284-299.


Ahuvia Goren

Ahuvia Goren is a research assistant in the department of Jewish History in Tel Aviv University and Studies for M.A In the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas. His research deals with Jewish intellectual history of the modern era, and focuses on natural philosophy in the eyes Rabbinic culture and on modern Jewish politics. Additionally he teaches Judaism and philosophy in 'Machanim' Rabbinical seminary, and is a member of the Interfaith Encounter Israel Organization, and the IARF Europe and Middle-East board.

 

Amit Varshitsky

Amit Varshizky is a lecturer in the TheHistory DepartmentatOranim academic college of Education. Hehas completed his PhD studies at the Zvi Yavetz Graduate School of Historical Studies, Tel Aviv University, in 2017. He is the author of few articles that were published in academic journals, such asIntellectual History Review, Politics, Religion & Ideology, Dapim:Studies on the Holocaust and more.He is also the co-editor of the forthcoming volume In Search of the Divine: the Religious Experience in a Secular World. His major area of research is intellectual history of Nazi Germany and the racial theory. He especially interested in the encounter between metaphysical ideas and scientific concepts that underlined the Nazi biological language, and the way it contributed to the emergence of new structures of meaning.

 

 




2015-2016

Research Group on "Inter-Group Relations"

in Cooperation with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation


This multi-year research project on “Neighbors and Neighborhoods” examined the impact of the urban environment on inter-group relations in Berlin, Tel Aviv and Warsaw from the early twentieth century till today. By focusing on the different ways that urban spaces, structures and settings influenced relations between members of different communities in each of these three cities, this project highlighted how modern cities facilitated both patterns of co-existence and moments of inter-group conflict. In doing so, this study challenged more traditional readings of inter-group relations that very often portrayed them as a pre-destined, endless series of conflicts, confrontations and violence.


Inbar Bondy


Inbar Bondy is a graduate student in the Jewish History department at Tel Aviv University. Her master's thesis will concentrate on representations and perceptions of time and space in diaries from the Warsaw Ghetto. She received her BA from Tel Aviv University in American Studies and the Multidisciplinary Program in the Humanities.


Ellia Etkin


Elia Etkin is a Ph.D. student in Tel-Aviv's University School of History. Tentatively entitled “Neighbors and Neighborhoods in the Cities of Mandatory Palestine,” her dissertation focuses on neighbors, neighborhoods and inter-group relations in urban settings. Her dissertation is being supervised by Prof. Billie Melman and Dr. Orit Rozin. Elia’s MA thesis, Wonder of Wonders Zoo, There is No Zoo Like You"! The Tel-Aviv Zoo, 1938-1958(Summa Cum Laude), was written under the supervision of Prof. Melman at TAU's Department of History. Her fields of interest include urban and social histories, inter-group relations, and the history of migration.


Inbal Feller


Inbal Feller graduated from The Hebrew University's Department of General History and Philosophy. She is currently working towards her Master's Degree in the Jewish History Department at TAU. Her interests include Jewish life in Mandatory Palestine and especially the tension between the development of Hebrew culture and cosmopolitan values in the city of Tel Aviv.


Merav Kaddar

Merav Kaddar started her PhD at the PECLAB (Planning for the Environment with Communities) in 2014. She received her M.Sc (with distinction) in Urban Studies from University College London (UCL) in 2013. She holds an additional M.A. in Philosophy from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (2012) where she also received her B.A. in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. Her research focuses on conflicted urban spaces in mixed-cities in Israel, focusing on political, historical and ethno-social tensions. Her work brings together a personal angle on memory and place, as well as comparative and theoretical components from the realm of Urban Planning. Her research hopes to suggest a planning method of dealing with past (urban) wrongdoings in conflicted urban spaces, such as Berlin.

Merav Kaddar is currently a PhD student at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

 


 

 

2014-2015

Research Group on "Antisemitism and Racism"

 

Nadia Ellis


Born and raised in Italy, Nadia Ellis made aliya to Israel in 2008 after spending six years spent in Paris where she completed her BA and MA in French and English Literatures at the Sorbonne-Paris IV University. Entitled “A Linguistic Analysis of 'The De-Legitimization of Israel,'” Nadia’s Ph.D. thesis focuses on the rhetorical uses of the "Delegitimization of Israel" in contemporary political discourse. The thesis is being written under the direction of Prof. Ruth Amossy. Throughout her research, Nadia analyzes the rhetorical and discursive strategies of both Israeli and foreign politicians and the different uses of the blurred and polemical aspects of the expression "Delegitimization of Israel."

Nadia Ellis has recently submitted her PhD dissertation.


Ellia Etkin


Elia Etkin is a Ph.D. student in Tel-Aviv's University School of History. Tentatively entitled “Neighbors and Neighborhoods in the Cities of Mandatory Palestine,” her dissertation focuses on neighbors, neighborhoods and inter-group relations in urban settings. Her dissertation is being supervised by Prof. Billie Melman and Dr. Orit Rozin. Elia’s MA thesis, Wonder of Wonders Zoo, There is No Zoo Like You"! The Tel-Aviv Zoo, 1938-1958(Summa Cum Laude), was written under the supervision of Prof. Melman at TAU's Department of History. Her fields of interest include urban and social histories, inter-group relations, and the history of migration.


Rahav Gabay


A Ph.D candidate in Tel Aviv University’s School of Psychology, Rahav Gabay is in the early stages of her doctoral dissertation on concepts of victimhood. Her research investigates how individual conceptions and states of victimhood affect inter-personal relationships and inter-group relationship in contemporary Israeli society. Rahav is conducting her doctorate under the supervision of Prof. Arie Nadler.


Itamar Haritan, Pieper Family Fellow

Itamar Haritan is an MA Candidate in Tel Aviv University in the Sociology and Anthropology Department. His research examines the way that Holocaust survivors in Israel relate to the Holocaust as an event increasing public significance and symbolism, and how personal and public Holocaust meanings intertwine in the relationships survivors form with others. Haritan got his BA in Anthropology in the University of California, Berkeley.

Itamar Haritan has recently submitted his MA thesis. 


Roy Marom


Roy Marom completed his B.A. summa cum laude in the departments of Arabic and Islamic Studies and Middle Eastern Studies at Tel Aviv University. He is currently working on his MA thesis on “Jewish-Arab Relations in Mandatory Palestine.”Roy’s thesis examines various aspects of the Palestinian communities living in the coastal plain during the late-Ottoman and British Mandate periods with a focus on social interaction between Jews and Arabs including interfaith relationships, crime and religious conversions.

 

Rami Neudorfer


Born and raised in Israel, Rami Neudorfer (B.Sc, MBA) has had a long career in electrical engineering, specializing in digital radio technologies and secure communication. Turning to his passion, Rami is in the final phases of submitting his MA Thesis on the Jewish Ghetto Police and Archives.  Among  his recent papers are: "The Chronicles and the Archives of the Kovno Ghetto Jewish Police" and 'Struggle for Power and Alternative Leadership, Kovno Ghetto – New Discoveries," which will be presented in December, 2014 at the international conference, Aspects of Jewish Solidarity, Mutual Help, Animosities and Tensions within Jewish Society During the Shoah. His research examines the Jewish ghettos and their relationships with the neighboring communities.

Rami is currently a PhD student at Tel Aviv University.


Raz Segal


Raz Segal earned his Ph.D. at the StrasslerCenter for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University (2013), and is now a Postdoctoral Fellow at TAU’s Yavetz School of Historical Studies. His post-doctoral research is on the topic of “Making Hungary Greater: New Perspectives on World War II and the Holocaust.” Raz’s doctoral dissertation, Disintegration: Social Breakdown and Political Mass Violence in Subcarpathian Rus’, pieces together the history of Subcarpathian Rus from the perspectives of national and regional authorities in a number of states (ruled by Hungary in World War II), and as viewed by the multi-ethnic and multi-religious population as it responded to war, shifting borders, and state-led mass violence.  His publications include his first book, Days of Ruin: The Jews of Munkács during the Holocaust and articles in The Journal of Genocide Research,Holocaust Studies and Polin.

Raz Segal is an assistant professor in Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Stockton University, New Jersey. 


Amir Teicher, Pieper Family Fellow


Amir Teicher received his Ph.D. from Tel Aviv University in 2014. Written under the supervision of Prof. Shula Volkov and Prof. Eva Jablonka, his thesis was on “The Impact of Mendel’s Theories on the Humanistic Sciences in Germany, 1900-1936.” Since then, Amir has completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Hebrew University’s Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and Medicine, and is currently a visiting scholar at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot. Amir’s research interests include the study of Nazism, the development of scientific methods in modern Europe and their influence on the social sciences, the history of biological thought, and the connection between statistical and visual methods of analysis. Through his historical work, Amir seeks to understand the development of scientific methods in their cultural contexts and to highlight the dynamic relationship between the concept of expert knowledge and its influence on interpretations of human nature and society.

Amir Teicher is a lecturer in TAU's Department of History.

 


 

 

2012-2014

Research Group on "Antisemitism and Racism"

 

 Jonathan Bensoussan

Jonathan Bensoussan is a graduate student in the department of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University. Under the supervision of Prof. Yaron Tsur and Dr. Orit Rozin, Jonathan's M.A. thesis examines the public discourse surrounding North African immigrants to Israel during the state's first decade.

Jonathan holds a LL.B and a B.A. in Jewish History from Tel Aviv University. Jonathan's legal experience is mainly in public law, as well as in the field of human and civil rights. Until recently, Jonathan worked as a lawyer in one of Israel's largest human rights organizations, the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, ACRI.

 

 Karma Ben Johanan, Pieper Family Fellow

Karma Ben Johanan is a Ph.D. candidate in Tel Aviv University's School of History. She completed her B.A. in TAU's Adi Lautman Interdisciplinary Program for Honors Students and her M.A. in Comparative Religion, summa cum laude, also from TAU. Her doctoral dissertation concentrates on Jewish theological and halakhic perceptions of Christianity and on Catholic perceptions of Judaism over the last fifty years in Israel, Noth America and Europe. Throughout her dissertation, Karma examines developments in both theological systems regarding the other religion, and attempts to understand the specific social and historical contexts within which these specific perceptions developed.

Karma Ben-Johanan is currently a Polonsky Fellow at the Van Leer Institute of Jerusalem.


Ofra Bloch (2012-2013)

Ofra Bloch received her LL.B. (magna cum laude) from Tel Aviv University. She is also a graduate (B.A. and M.A.) of TAU's Adi Lautman Interdisciplinary Program for Honors Students.

Currently, Ofra is an LL.M. student at the Zvi Meitar Center for Advanced Legal Studies, writing her Master's thesis under the direction of Supreme Court Justice Prof. Daphne Barak-Erez and Prof. Yishai Blank of the Tel Aviv University. Her research focuses on inequality and discrimination in education, in particular patterns of racial and ethnic segregation.  Throughout her thesis, she also examines the different legal mechanisms aimed at coping with these issues. Come spring, Ofra will begin her legal internship under Supreme Court Justice Esther Hayut.

Ofra  Bloch is  a JSD candidate at Yale Law School.

 

Assaf Derri



Assaf Derri is a graduate student in the literature department at Tel Aviv University, and a student in the European Studies program of TAU. Under the supervision of Prof. Yael Levo, Assaf is writing his MA thesis on questions of race and racism in  the early oeuvre of the playwright Harold Pinter.

Assaf completed his BA in literature at the Open University, summa cum laude, and holds an LLB from Tel Aviv University. He teaches Law at the College of Management Law School in Rishon Letzion, and recently published an article in HaMishpat Law Review titled: 'Property Rights of Third Parties in Repossession Procedures'

(http://hamishpat.colman.ac.il/eng/Issues/vol17_1/article,1155/)


Noam Gil

A Ph.D candidate at the Porter School of Cultural Studies at Tel Aviv University, Noam is currently working on his doctoral thesis entitled: “The Burden of Identity: The Survivor in Post-Holocaust Jewish American Literature.” His research, conducted under the supervision of Prof. Hana Wirth-Nesher, focuses on the representation of Holocaust survivors in American Jewish literature. Noam completed his B.A and M.A in Tel Aviv University's department of literature.

Noam Gil is currently a Dan David Fellow at Tel Aviv University.

 

Racheli Shenhav-Goldberg


Racheli is currently a student in the doctoral program at Tel Aviv University's Bob Shapell School of Social Work where she completed her B.A. and M.A.. Her research focuses on racism and its various and sundry consequences. Her Master’s thesis was entitled: "Perceived Racism, Emotional and Behavioral Responses, and Internalized Racism among Ethiopian Adolescent Girls in Israel". Racheli’s doctoral thesis examines the psychological and social costs of racism endured by the racist. In addition to her studies, Racheli teaches at the School of Social Work at Ashekelon College. She is also the chief coordinator of “The Coalition of Organization for Young Women at Risk".

Racheli Shenhav-Goldberg has recently submitted her PHD thesis.


Amit Varshizky, Pieper Family Fellow

Amit Varshizky is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of History at Tel Aviv University. He completed his B.A. in Communications at the Academic College of Emek Izrael and his M.A.(cum laude) at the Department of History at Tel Aviv University. His master's thesis examined the philosophy of Alfred Rosenberg, the chief ideologue of the National-Socialist movement. An article on the subject was recently published in the Journal of Politics, Religion and Ideology.Entitled Mind and Soul in the Nazi Weltanschauung Amit's doctoral dissertation focuses on the Nazi view of soul and consciousness.

Amit also teaches at the Department of Cultural Studies at the Academic College of Sapir and in the Department of Communications at the Academic College of Emek Izrael.

Amit Varshizky has recently submitted his PhD thesis.

 

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