Courses

  • Online / Hybrid Courses
  • SEMINAR
  • Frontal Lectures
Online / Hybrid Courses

SEMESTER A

The First Three Millenia

Prof. Yoram Cohen 

0609-1005-01

 Online learning

A general introduction to the ancient Near East from the beginning of the writing civilizations in the 4th millennium till the conquest of Alexander at the end of the first millennium BCE. An overview of the major historical and cultural developments will be given. A special emphasis will be given to the invention of Cuneiform and Hieroglyphic writings and the development and spread of the Alphabet.

SYLLABUS

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Foundational Problems in the Philosophy of Science

Dr. Ori Belkind

0609-1002-01

Hybrid course–combine face to face classes and online learning

This course focuses on central philosophical approaches to science following the scientific revolution in the 17th century and the revolution in physical sciences during the 20th century. Topics discussed include: Francis Bacon’s and Renי Descartes’ early attempts to describe the role of experience and reason in constructing scientific knowledge; Isaac Newton’s philosophical principles for studying nature; David Hume’s skepticism and his critique of inferences from phenomena; the philosophical crisis that followed the collapse of classical physics during the early 20th century; and some of the main philosophical approaches that were developed in response to this crisis, including those of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn.

SYLLABUS

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What is Culture ? Between West and East

Dr. Almog Behar

0609-1003-01 

 Online learning

This introductory course explores the concept of culture as a means of rethinking East- West relations. We discuss inter-cultural transfer and influence, between Babylonian and Greek cultures, the rise of

Christianity and Islam, medieval Arab and European translation legacies, modernity and orientalism, theology and secularism. We discuss the beginning of the epic, comparing the Babylonian “Gilgamesh” to the Greek “Odyssey”; the figures of the prophet and the messenger in the Bible, the New Testament and the Quran; reformers and revivers of religious life, such as Al-Ghazali’s and Augustine’s autobiographies; the Middle Ages’ transformation, translation, and adaptation of the Buddha’s story into Greek, Arabic and Hebrew; the critical reception of “Eastern” poets such as Jalal a-Din Rumi and Rabindranath Tagore in the “West.”

SYLLABUS

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Information and Communication Technologies

Dr. Arnon Hershkovitz

0609-1004-01

Hybrid course–combine face to face classes and online learning

This course discusses various implementations of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the teaching process. Technology may bring new opportunities that will enrich teaching processes in both formal learning (e.g., schools, higher education, army, organizations) and informal settings. However, technology may also present teachers with some important academic, pedagogical, social, and technical challenges. During the course, we critically examine models for successful implementations of technology in teaching. We ask whether the technological tail is being wagged by the pedagogical dog, or is it the other way around?

SYLLABUS

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Dead Sea Scrolls: Old and New Perspectives

Prof. Jonathan Ben Dov

 
0609-1006-01

 Online learning

This course focuses on the scrolls- a vast collection of books from the Second Temple period- found in the Qumran caves. Some of the scrolls describe the life of an isolated community, its regulations, laws and customs. Others describe the books of the Bible and other holy writings from that period, as well as writings of prayer, law, poetry, and magic. These ancient scrolls offer a rare opportunity to study the cultural and religious life of Jews in the Second Temple days. The findings show that key concepts of classical Judaism (which were later formulated by the Sages) were contested the days of the Second Temple. For example,  the the collection of the Holy Scriptures, the interpretation of the Bible, the prayer, the Halacha, were all subject to debate. The scrolls are also an important source for understanding how books looked at that time, and how scribes and copyists prepared manuscripts. The course offers a literary analysis of the scrolls, as well as the use of recent technological developments, such as material research of the scrolls and of the Qumran site, and a variety of computing tools, which enable a technological view of the scrolls

SYLLABUS

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Investigating Literature: Fictional Mysteries, Mysteries of Fiction, and the Det

Mr. Dror Mishani

0609-1007-01

Hybrid course–combine face to face classes and online learning

Investigative literature has long been one of the most popular forms of the story telling. It may have started when "Oedipus Rex" was staged in ancient Athens and continues to flourish in the detective stories we read and in TV series we watch today. In this course, we examine some well-known literary investigations, apparently already "solved." But with the help of fictional and real detectives -- from Hamlet and Sigmund Freud, to Edgar Allan Poe, Sherlock Holmes and Miss Marple - we revisit these cases, and also raise some theoretical questions: What can literary investigations teach us? Why should the investigators be investigated? And are ??there mysteries that we will never be able to solve

SYLLABUS

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Climate Change and Sustainability: a Multi-Disciplinary View

Prof. Ruth Ronen

188.0901.01

 Online learning

The climate crisis is not only a research topic but mainly a burning problem that affects every aspect of our lives. We encounter the causes and effects of the climate crisis in all areas of life: the environment, society, nature, forms of thought, politics, and the economy.
This online course offers a multidisciplinary examination of the climate crisis and provides a comprehensive picture of it. The lecturers in the course are experts from various fields of knowledge: environmental and atmospheric sciences, climate sciences, biology, industrial ecology, philosophy, history, geography, social sciences (sociology and economics), psychology, architecture (urban planning), engineering, economics, law and public policy.
The course is designed to introduce students to the complexity of the climate crisis and its consequences, but also to examine the range of solutions and courses of action that are possible at the level of the state, of the organizations, and at the level of the individual.

 

SYLLABUS

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SEMESTER B

Mindfulness and Buddhism: Practice and Theory Then and Now

Dr.Ricardo Tarrasch

Dr. Roy Tzohar 

0609-1008-01

 Online learning

The course is an introduction to mindfulness meditation (sati, smiti), presenting its Buddhist philosophical and historical foundations; surveying contemporary empirical models that explain and appraise its action and effect; and, dealing with the application of its practice in daily life. The first part of the course provides an overview of mindfulness as a practice, examine its influence on attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and explore its cultivation in daily life. The second part focuses on the Buddhist origins and nature of mindfulness meditation. We survey the context, both theoretical and practical, for the emergence of Buddhism in India, and present central Buddhist doctrines and claims (such as the “no-self” claim and scheme of dependent-origination) and the solution they propose to the problem of human suffering, and their unique understanding of the person. The final part of the course examines recent studies appraising the effects of the practice of mindfulness on emotional and cognitive processes, such as resilience: anxiety/stress; pain management; as well as on brain structure and function.  We also outline some of the contemporary scholarly models for mindfulness mechanisms of action

SYLLABUS

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A Matter of Life and Death:Medicine and Health on the Pre-Modern World

Prof. Miri Shefer Mossensohn

0609-1009-01

Hybrid course–combine face to face classes and online learning

 

"Health is Wealth", the most important thing in our lives, right? But what are health, hygiene and disease? What is the medical treatment that transfers us from a state of illness to health? Health, illness and healing are universal experiences but they are far from uniform. Medicine is a science that is particularly influenced by social, cultural and political realities. The tensions around coping with the Covid-19 epidemic, for example the attitudes to masks, vaccines and closures, illustrated for us the variety of perceptions and practices that shape our choices in everything related to our health.

The course examines the ways in which men and women, healers and patients, understood illness, health and medical knowledge from Antiquity to the 18th century. The course focuses, but not exclusively, on the Middle East and the Mediterranean basin; we will also foray into East Asia and Europe in pre-modern times. We will learn about the variety of medical knowledge and clinical applications in previous historical periods, andunderstand how today's medicine and the health systems were shaped by successes and discoveries but also failures.


 

SYLLABUS

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